Jakarta Post

Please Update your browser

Your browser is out of date, and may not be compatible with our website. A list of the most popular web browsers can be found below.
Just click on the icons to get to the download page.

Jakarta Post
press enter to search

The Jakarta Post
Video Weather icon 26°C
DKI Jakarta, Indonesia
26°C Light Rain

Light rain later this morning and this evening.

  • Thu

    26℃ - 31℃

  • Fri

    25℃ - 32℃

  • Sat

    26℃ - 32℃

  • Sun

    28℃ - 31℃

UK prince, injured US officer launch Warrior Games

  • The Jakarta Post

    The Jakarta Post

Colorado Springs, Colorado | Sun, May 12 2013 | 04:48 pm

Combat helicopter pilot Prince Harry of Britain along with Olympic swimming champion Missy Franklin joined an American naval officer who had been blinded in Afghanistan in launching the Warrior Games for wounded service members.

Lt. Bradley Snyder, Harry and Franklin lifted a torch Saturday to ignite an Olympic-style cauldron, after completing the last leg of a brief torch relay at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs to formally start the games.

It was a touching start to the Paralympic-style games, which run through Thursday. About 260 athletes are competing in basketball, volleyball, shooting, archery, track and field and swimming '€” Snyder's sport.

Britain sent a 35-member team, and the prince met with the athletes earlier in the day. He also sat on a gymnasium floor in a circle of 12 sitting volleyball players, batting the ball around amid whoops and laughter.

Harry served as a combat helicopter in pilot in Afghanistan, and the British veterans said that makes him easy to talk to.

"He knows what it's like out there," said Army Capt. Dave Henson, a member of the volleyball team. "He's been on the ground and in the air."

Henson, 28, lost both legs when an improvised bomb exploded in Afghanistan two years ago. He said Harry took a personal interest in the athletes' recovery and the quality of their health care.

Royal Marine Matthew Hancox, 25, said the prince recognized some wounded veterans he had met before and asked them how they were recovering.

"He's very down-to-earth," said Hancox, who was shot in the chest in Afghanistan in 2011.

 

TRY A DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION

Join the discussions