Please Update your browser

Your browser is out of date, and may not be compatible with our website. A list of the most popular web browsers can be found below.
Just click on the icons to get to the download page.

Jakarta Post
The Jakarta Post
Video Weather icon 30°C
DKI Jakarta, Indonesia
weather-icon
30°C Partly Cloudy

Dry and mostly cloudy throughout the day.

  • weather-icon

    Wed

    26℃ - 32℃

  • weather-icon

    Thu

    25℃ - 32℃

  • weather-icon

    Fri

    25℃ - 31℃

  • weather-icon

    Sat

    26℃ - 30℃

Asian Games: Indonesian judokas go home empty handed

  • Gemma Holliani Cahya
    Gemma Holliani Cahya

    The Jakarta Post

Jakarta | Fri, August 31, 2018 | 04:04 pm
Asian Games: Indonesian judokas go home empty handed Indonesian judoka Horas Manurung (in blue outfit) fights Thai Masayuki Terada in the SEA Games men's 81-kilogram final match in Kuala Lumpur. Terada won with an ippon on Aug. 27, 2017. (The Jakarta Post/Seto Wardana)

Indonesian judokas left the Asian Games arena empty handed, a shocking reality for the association.

“Honestly it is hard to compete at the Asian Games level. […] We sent 11 fighters to compete in 16 categories and the best achievement was by Ardelia Yuli Fradivtha, who reached the quarterfinals in the women’s under 63-kg class,” team manager Col. Czi Amalsyah Tarmizi told The Jakarta Post on Friday.

In the lower level of competition at the Southeast Asian (SEA) Games two years ago in Kuala Lumpur, national judokas won two gold medals and one silver.

Tarmizi said the poor performance was not due to tough competition in the arena against judokas from Japan, South Korea and Central Asian countries - most of whom had won world championship titles and Olympic Games medals - but also the athletes' physical condition.

Tarmizi said the Indonesian Judo Association (PJI) would encourage more young children to start learning the Japanese-origin martial arts, including by sending some young children to the judo dormitory in Ciloto, West Java.

“In other countries like Japan and Korea, they train their athletes from an early age. Here, judo is less popular. It is not easy to find a dojo. That is one of the reasons why judo is not developing here," he said.

Tarmizi said the PJI would look forward by focusing on the 2019 SEA Games in the Philippines.

“We want to maintain our achievement as the overall champion [of judo] in the SEA Games,” he said. (yan)

 

Join the discussions