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Jordanian graffiti artists brighten Amman's drab streets

  • A picture taken on December 17, 2017 shows a graffiti mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants.
In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

    A picture taken on December 17, 2017 shows a graffiti mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants. In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

  • A picture taken on December 18, 2017 shows a graffiti mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants.
In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

    A picture taken on December 18, 2017 shows a graffiti mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants. In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

  • A picture taken on December 18, 2017 shows a graffiti mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants.
In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

    A picture taken on December 18, 2017 shows a graffiti mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants. In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

  • A picture taken on December 18, 2017 shows a graffiti mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants.
In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

    A picture taken on December 18, 2017 shows a graffiti mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants. In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

  • A picture taken on December 17, 2017 shows a graffiti mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants.
In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

    A picture taken on December 17, 2017 shows a graffiti mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants. In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

  • A picture taken on December 16, 2017 shows children skateboarding next to graffiti murals in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants.
In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

    A picture taken on December 16, 2017 shows children skateboarding next to graffiti murals in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants. In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

  • A picture taken on December 16, 2017 shows graffiti artists drawing a mural in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants.
In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

    A picture taken on December 16, 2017 shows graffiti artists drawing a mural in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants. In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

  • Suhaib Attar, a 25-year-old graffiti artist and student, picks up a canister of spray paint as he draws a mural on a wall in the capital Jordanian Amman on December 16, 2017. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants.
In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

    Suhaib Attar, a 25-year-old graffiti artist and student, picks up a canister of spray paint as he draws a mural on a wall in the capital Jordanian Amman on December 16, 2017. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants. In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

  • Suhaib Attar, a 25-year-old graffiti artist and student, looks on as he draws a mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman on December 16, 2017. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants.
In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

    Suhaib Attar, a 25-year-old graffiti artist and student, looks on as he draws a mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman on December 16, 2017. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants. In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

  • A picture taken on December 16, 2017 shows a graffiti artist drawing a mural in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants.
In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

    A picture taken on December 16, 2017 shows a graffiti artist drawing a mural in the Jordanian capital Amman. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants. In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

  • Suha Sultan, a 20-year-old graffiti artist and student, uses a brush to draw a mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman on December 16, 2017.
A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants.
In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

    Suha Sultan, a 20-year-old graffiti artist and student, uses a brush to draw a mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman on December 16, 2017. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants. In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

  • Suha Sultan, a 20-year-old graffiti artist and student, looks on as she sits in front of a mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman on December 16, 2017.
A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants.
In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

    Suha Sultan, a 20-year-old graffiti artist and student, looks on as she sits in front of a mural on a wall in the Jordanian capital Amman on December 16, 2017. A tiny group of graffiti artists are on a mission -- daubing flowers, faces and patterns across the capital Amman to bring more colour to the lives of its four million inhabitants. In a conservative society like Jordan's, the graffiti artists have constantly had to challenge convention to carve out a niche for their works, though still with limits as they steer away from politics and religion. AFP/Khalil Mazraawi

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