Please Update your browser

Your browser is out of date, and may not be compatible with our website. A list of the most popular web browsers can be found below.
Just click on the icons to get to the download page.

Jakarta Post
The Jakarta Post
Video Weather icon 30°C
DKI Jakarta, Indonesia
weather-icon
30°C Partly Cloudy

Dry and mostly cloudy throughout the day.

  • weather-icon

    Wed

    26℃ - 32℃

  • weather-icon

    Thu

    25℃ - 32℃

  • weather-icon

    Fri

    25℃ - 31℃

  • weather-icon

    Sat

    26℃ - 30℃

Tokyo Medical University manipulated male applicants' scores: Sources

  • News Desk

    Kyodo News

Tokyo | Wed, August 8, 2018 | 03:01 am
Tokyo Medical University manipulated male applicants' scores: Sources The entrance exam bias came to light in the course of an internal investigation by the university's lawyers in the wake of the bribery scandal. (Shutterstock/File)

Tokyo Medical University subtracted entrance exam points for male applicants who were taking the test for at least the fourth time to curb admissions of such examinees, sources familiar with the matter said Monday.

The revelation came after the medical college was found to have deducted entrance exam points from all female applicants to keep the ratio of women studying at the university at around 30 percent.

The score manipulations were ordered by former Chairman Masahiko Usui, 77, with former President Mamoru Suzuki, 69, and a university official also involved, the sources said.

The conduct was discovered in the wake of a bribery scandal involving the university's top executives and a senior education ministry official.

In July, Usui and Suzuki resigned as the chairman and president of the university, respectively, following allegations that they bribed a bureaucrat, Futoshi Sano, 59, in the form of guaranteeing his son's enrollment in exchange for a government subsidy. All three have since been indicted.

Read also: Tokyo medical university cut women's exam scores to curb numbers: Media

The entrance exam bias came to light in the course of an internal investigation by the university's lawyers in the wake of the bribery scandal. The lawyers' report is expected to be released on Tuesday afternoon.

The practice of deducting exam points for female applicants likely began around 2010 and was apparently meant to avoid a shortage of doctors at affiliated hospitals.

The medical college believed female doctors often resign or take long leave after getting married or giving birth, leading to potential shortfalls, sources said earlier.

NEWS PULSE

Join the discussions