Data breaches have become a contentious issue worldwide after Facebook, which has 137 million users in Indonesia, admitted that British political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica had harvested data of 80 million users. The Jakarta Post’s Safrin La Batu explores challenges and how the government will help protect citizens’ privacy online. 

by Safrin La Batu

When people around the globe were fuming at news about British political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica harvesting their information from Facebook, local users generally couldn’t care less. When Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg promised steps to better safeguard users’ data, local users did not celebrate either. But the government, as it usually did when dealing with recalcitrant social networking websites in the past, threatened to block the platform here unless the social media juggernaut fixed the system. Politicians and new media pundits seized the moment to amplify their call for new legislation on data protection. A crucial issue in their mind is how third-party companies should handle users’ information and how the business entities should be held to account. Apparently, many social media users have no good grasp of how social media works, a...