press enter to search

Bali charity exhibition empowers children through art

Richard Horstman
Richard Horstman

Artivist, observes and reports on developments in the Bali and Indonesian art scenes

Denpasar | Thu, March 2, 2017 | 03:50 pm
Bali charity exhibition empowers children through art

Creativity during the opening of Drawing Future: Charcoal for Children (CFC). (JP/Richard Horstman)

CushCush Gallery of Denpasar announced its arrival on Bali’s art scene in July 2016 with Crucible, the gallery’s collaborative exhibition with Australian designer, educator and academic Ross McLeod.

Exploring ideas of alchemical synthesis, association of natural process and craftsmanship, McLeod’s sculptural objects were enhanced by CushCush Gallery’s savvy presentation. The impact was immediate. A fresh, alternative gallery, highlighted by a sound vision was born; a timely and exciting contribution to the island’s art infrastructure.

Feb. 24 saw CushCush Gallery open its first charity exhibition under the program Drawing Future: Charcoal for Children (CFC) 2016/17. The free program is designed to empower children through art and creativity, while raising environmental awareness through the making and use of DIY charcoal as a creative tool.

Feb. 24 saw CushCush Gallery open its first charity exhibition under the program Drawing Future: Charcoal for Children (CFC) 2016/17.(JP/Richard Horstman)

Six invited artists, with the help of 35 volunteers from local creative communities, worked together with 103 children from various backgrounds to create the exhibited collaborative artworks. The event was officiated by the Australian consul general, Dr. Helena Studdert.  

Read also: New 'Beauty and the Beast' toy teaches children to code

“Charcoal For Children is a grassroots movement that is supported by the arts, design and creative communities in Bali and Indonesia, as well as friends from overseas,” CushCush cofounder Suriawati Qiu said. “Having traveled and lived overseas, I have witnessed how important creative education is to future generations. We are also concerned with the lack of emphasis on art and creativity in the local education system.”

“CushCush wants to highlight the importance of fostering creativity in children from an early age, within a non-evaluative learning framework,” added Suriawati’s partner and co-founder Jindee Chua. “Early and consistent exposure to the arts and creativity enhances critical thinking and creative problem-solving skills in children, as well as strengthening their self-confidence.”

Charcoal For Children is a grassroots movement that is supported by the arts, design and creative communities in Bali and Indonesia.(JP/Richard Horstman)

The duo met in Australia while studying at RMIT Melbourne; Jindee pursuing an architecture degree and Suriawati studying interior design. The love of art and creativity consolidated their relationship, and they went on to form CushCush, a design studio workshop in Denpasar. Their focus is on experimenting with the abundant indigenous materials, textures, techniques and traditional crafts of Bali. With an emphasis on sustainability, many of their design products are the result of upcycling.

CushCush presented 'Make Your Own Charcoal' workshop in August 2016 as a part of its LagiLagi programs, upcycling production off-cuts, giving them new life and turning them into useful things for everyday life.

Read also: Study: Nearly 60 percent of children like reading for fun

A first CFC workshop in September 2016 was followed by another in October and a third one in January. Participating artists were Wayan ‘Suklu’ Sujana, Reno Ganesha, Noella Roos, Nyoman Wijaya, Natisa Jones and Budi ‘Kabul’ Agung Kuswara. CushCush presents a year-round program of exhibitions and will continue to grow its residency and collaboration programs, facilitating exchanges between an international community of artists and creative minds in Bali.

Six invited artists, with the help of 35 volunteers from local creative communities, worked together with 103 children from various backgrounds to create the exhibited collaborative artworks.(JP/Richard Horstman)

At art exhibitions, there is usually a great divide between the artworks and the creative process. Rarely is the process under the spotlight. During the opening of Drawing Future, however, the creative process was on display, enriched by the enthusiasm of children of all ages busily sketching, interacting and having fun.

Could there be any human expression more potent and satisfying for adults to witness and adore?

 

Title: Drawing Charcoal: Charity For Children Exhibition 2016/17

Date: Continues until May 13

Place: Jl. Teuku Umar Gg. Rajawali No.1A, Denpasar 80113, Bali

Contact: ( 62 ) 361 484558

www.cushcushgallery.com

***

Richard Horstman, a cultural observer with over 25 years experience in Indonesia, has supported the Bali & Indonesian art scenes for more than 9 years as a journalist, writer, art tourism presenter & Advisor at Cata Odata Art Space in Ubud. A bridge between the art world and the public, he’s been published in the Jakarta Post and Jakarta Globe newspapers, Art Republik, Now! Singapore, ARTI, Indo Expat, & UbudLife magazines. Visit his personal blog or Facebook.

---------------
Interested to write for thejakartapost.com? We are looking for information and opinions from experts in a variety of fields or others with appropriate writing skills. The content must be original on the following topics: lifestyle ( beauty, fashion, food ), entertainment, science & technology, health, parenting, social media, travel, and sports. Send your piece to [email protected] For more information click here.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official stance of The Jakarta Post.

Comments