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Jakarta Post
The Jakarta Post
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Sandiaga plans to develop more child-friendly parks

  • News Desk
    News Desk

    The Jakarta Post

Jakarta | Thu, March 8, 2018 | 05:45 pm
Sandiaga plans to develop more child-friendly parks Children play at an integrated child-friendly public space (RPTRA) in Krendang, West Jakarta, on Sept. 18, 2017. (Antara/Makna Zaezar)

Jakarta Deputy Governor Sandiaga Uno has called for the development of integrated child-friendly public spaces (RPTRAs) next year despite a lack of vacant land in the city.

Previously, Jakarta Public Housing and Public Buildings Agency head Agustino Darmawan said the city might stop developing the public spaces next year as there were enough of them.

There are 290 RPTRA in 267 subdistricts in the city, meaning some subdistricts have more than one park.

The administration might focus on developing more green urban spaces as the percentage of them in the city was considered low, Agustino said.  

Sandiaga said on Thursday that RPTRAs, which were developed in a program started by former Jakarta governor Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama, were positive for residents and should be further developed.

However, due to a lack of vacant land, the city administration would team up with private parties to provide the facilities, Sandiaga said.

“We’re formulating policies that can give incentives for private parties,” Sandiaga said on Thursday as quoted by kompas.com, adding that the incentives could include the reduction of property taxes or placement of advertisements at the public spaces.

Green spaces occupy roughly 10 percent of land in Jakarta, even though the prevailing law requires that the city allocate 30 percent of land for green spaces.

Sandiaga said the residents did not have to differentiate between RPTRAs and green spaces as both were needed. (cal)

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