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Don't worry late bloomers, your time will come

Theresia Clara
Theresia Clara

Loves dancing, traveling, writing, fashion and photography

Kuala Lumpur  /  Tue, September 10, 2019  /  10:12 am
Don't worry late bloomers, your time will come

It is better for some things to happen later in life. (Shutterstock/-)

While the fear of missing out (FOMO) syndrome is often associated with youngsters who keep busy to not miss opportunities, the truth is, we experience the same kind of fear regardless of age.

Even before social media played a huge part in changing communication and increasing FOMO, we may have experienced it at school, college or work. Remember when your schoolmates went gaga over surfing clothing brands such as Roxy and Billabong then you decided to get one, too?

As we grow older, the fear could be triggered when a friend earns a job with a big company, gets married, owns Bitcoin… the list goes on. There will always be new fears of missing out in every stage of life.

If this sounds like you, hopefully, these four points help you persevere until your big break comes.

Keep on practicing, you’ll be ready when the opportunity arises

People don’t become successful by just waiting for their big break, they work for it.

Sure, some people are fortunate to have their talent discovered or have a strong background to help them achieve success. However, that’s not always the case.

A great example is the success journey of the famous artist Michelangelo Buonarroti. The Florence-born prodigy was 14 years old when he was personally invited for an apprenticeship by Lorenzo de Medici, the most powerful patron of renaissance culture in Italy. From that moment, Michelangelo’s career skyrocketed.

Was it a coincidence? Absolutely not.

At that time, Michelangelo had an apprenticeship with a famous artist, Domenico Ghirlandaio – a position he asked for. He wanted to be an artist, but he knew he couldn’t do it on his own. So, he approached Domenico to hone his talents and kept practicing. When the opportunity came, he was ready.

As Jeff Goins, the author of Real Artists Don’t Starve writes, we can’t control when or how our big break comes, but we can be ready for it – first by practicing, and then by making the most of it.

Read also: When goal obsession goes wrong

It’s OK to miss out, if it sparks joy in your life

There will always be events that you’d like to attend, new places to explore, birthday parties, cool café for your Instagram photo and so on.

But what if you’re unable to keep up with all of those? Maybe you’re too busy practicing, don’t have enough resources or an introvert who enjoys spending time by yourself? Don’t worry, you’re not alone.

A survey of more than 2,200 people across the United Kingdom found that 78 percent of millennials actively engaged in the joy of missing out (JOMO) at the expense of socializing with friends and taking up new activities. The study reveals that their love of streaming services, wanting to save money and spending quality time with friends are the reasons behind the trend shift.

They choose to do things that spark joy in their lives. It’s not about the quantity, but the quality of activities that counts.

Be inspired, be patient and create your own path

According to The Odyssey, an aspect of FOMO is choice overload. It’s good to try new things and find your niche. However, it doesn’t mean you have to try everything just so you don’t feel left out and then end up hating it all.

I have a lot of role models who inspire me. One of them is Trinity, a successful travel writer and blogger. I’m captivated by her book The Naked Traveler, in which she shares her joy and tears when traveling.

I was 16 years old when I read her first book. She inspired me to explore the world and create my own travel blog. But at that time, I was still studying, broke and didn’t have any travel experience to share.

I started traveling once I stepped into the corporate world. Even after a few trips, I still felt something was missing to create a blog.

I wanted it to be more meaningful, therefore, I waited a few more years when suddenly the financial world appealed to me. Then, I did (and still do) my homework to learn about digital marketing from various websites so I can reach a global audience.

It took me 11 years to finally launch a travel and finance blog, where I wish to inspire millennials to travel the world yet still be financially-savvy.

It doesn’t matter how long it takes to bring your vision into reality, enjoy the process and be yourself. Be unique instead of following someone else’s path.

Getting married shouldn’t be a life goal

In Indonesia, getting married is seen as a social achievement. Surprisingly,  a 2010 census by Statistics Indonesia (BPS) indicated that one in 14 Indonesian aged 30-39 have never married. The statistic is also predicted to increase in the next census in 2020.

Karel Karsten Himawan, a doctoral candidate from the University of Queensland, pointed out in his study that the majority of Indonesian singles suffered from peer pressure. Those who chose not to marry (especially women) are perceived as not meeting sociocultural expectations and may experience negative social and psychological impact.

Getting married within a certain range of age shouldn’t be the sole life goal anymore. There’s nothing wrong with getting married, remarried or being single even when you’ve passed the big three-o.

As humans, we are prone to comparing ourselves with the success of others, forgetting that everyone is running their own race, in their own time.

Someone else’s success may not be something that really sparks joy in life should it happen to us. It is better for some things to happen later in life.

What are we rushing for?

Life isn’t about becoming the one who starts first, but to be the one who ends well. Your time will come. (kes)

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Clara loves dancing, traveling, writing, fashion and photography. She’s also an avid practitioner of the FIRE movement and believes people can travel the world yet still be financially responsible. Check out her blog agirlnamedclara.com.

 

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official stance of The Jakarta Post.