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Jakarta Post

Indonesia receives tax data from 98 AEOI partner countries

  • News Desk

    The Jakarta Post

Jakarta   /   Wed, July 24, 2019   /   03:47 pm
Indonesia receives tax data from 98 AEOI partner countries Taxation director general Robert Pakpahan (kompas.com/Yoga Sukmana)

The Directorate General of Taxation has said that Indonesia has partnered with 98 countries since it joined the international treaty on the Automatic Exchange of Information (AEOI) last year to tackle tax evasion.

The partner countries include tax havens like Hong Kong, Singapore and Panama.

Tax office spokesman Hestu Yoga Saksama said that the 98 countries were on the latest update to the list of countries that had provided their tax data to Indonesia, while Indonesia had provided its tax data to 82 countries.

Last December, 65 countries had provided their tax data to Indonesia, while Indonesia had provided its tax data to 54 countries.  

“We will continue to expand the number [of countries reporting to Indonesia] and by late September, this is expected to increase to 102 countries,” Hestu said on Tuesday in Jakarta as quoted by kontan.co.id.

Taxation director general Robert Pakpahan said the government would use the tax data from other countries to track down any Indonesian citizens with unpaid taxes.

“We are extra careful in filtering and cleaning up the data to ensure that we have accurate and matching data before we take any follow-up [measures],” said Robert.

He added that the tax office would manage the optimized use of data from other countries under its  two new directorates for taxation data and for information data and information communication technology.

However, tax information and data director Iwan Djuniardi said that not all data from other countries could be used to track unpaid taxes.

“Some of the data was rejected because they do not meet the data standard,” he said, referring to the Common Reporting Standard for AEOI. (bbn)