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Five plants to help you sleep and breathe better: NASA research

News Desk
News Desk

The Jakarta Post

Jakarta | Sun, October 29, 2017 | 10:03 am
Five plants to help you sleep and breathe better: NASA research

Prepare for a better night’s sleep and cleaner indoor air with these plants. (Shutterstock/File)

A good quality of sleep equals a good quality of life in general, and the right choice of plants in your living space might just help. As reported by tempo.co, NASA scientists have released a study on how to tackle indoor pollution that decreases the air quality in your house.

Prepare for a better night’s sleep and cleaner indoor air with these plants.

Areca Palm

Areca PalmAreca Palm (Shutterstock/File)

The most common indoor plant you can see in office buildings everywhere, the Areca Palm is not a mere decoration element. The plant adds air purification benefits, especially if you suffer from sinus troubles and common colds.

English Ivy

English IvyEnglish Ivy (Shutterstock/File)

Aside from its ‘Instagrammable’ decorative qualities, English Ivy is proved effective in removing 78 percent of airborne mold and 94 percent of airborne feces within 72 hours, as stated in a study by the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. A perfect indoor plant addition for those who suffer from allergies.

Read also: NASA discovers 10 new Earth-size exoplanets

Mother-in-law’s Tongue

Mother-in-law's TongueMother-in-law's Tongue (Shutterstock/File)

According to The Joy of Plants, this plant helps filter out toxic substances such as formaldehyde, trichloroethylene and benzene from the air.

Aloe Vera

Aloe VeraAloe Vera (Shutterstock/File)

Known for its beauty-enriching properties, Aloe Vera also plays an important part in our general well-being. According to NASA, Aloe Vera is one of the best plants for air purification as it continuously releases oxygen at night time. Its low-maintenance nature also makes it an excellent indoor plant.

Lady Palm

Lady PalmLady Palm (Shutterstock/File)

Another plant that’s often seen in indoor public spaces, the Lady Palm, has more than just decorative values. According to the NASA research, it is effective in removing toxic airborne substances such as formaldehyde, ammonia, xylene and toluene. (asw)

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