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Effort to recognize World War II spies hung up in Congress

  • Frank Gleason, 96, a retired colonel with the Office of Strategic Services, looks at his old blue mess dress uniform hanging on a door as he sits in his home in Atlanta, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. Legislation to recognize the contributions of a group of World War II spies is hung up in Congress. Some 75 years ago, the OSS carried out missions behind enemy lines in Nazi Germany and the Pacific theatre. The organization disbanded at the end of the war, but served as a forerunner to the CIA. AP Photo/David Goldman

    Frank Gleason, 96, a retired colonel with the Office of Strategic Services, looks at his old blue mess dress uniform hanging on a door as he sits in his home in Atlanta, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. Legislation to recognize the contributions of a group of World War II spies is hung up in Congress. Some 75 years ago, the OSS carried out missions behind enemy lines in Nazi Germany and the Pacific theatre. The organization disbanded at the end of the war, but served as a forerunner to the CIA. AP Photo/David Goldman

  • Frank Gleason, 96, a retired colonel with the Office of Strategic Services, looks over memorabilia decorating a wall in his home in Atlanta, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. Legislation to recognize the contributions of a group of World War II spies is hung up in Congress. Some 75 years ago, the OSS carried out missions behind enemy lines in Nazi Germany and the Pacific theatre. Gleason's group was tasked with halting the Japanese advance into China. Gleason and his comrades did this by detonating bridges, railroad tracks and anything else. 'We just blew stuff up left and right,' said Gleason. AP Photo/David Goldman

    Frank Gleason, 96, a retired colonel with the Office of Strategic Services, looks over memorabilia decorating a wall in his home in Atlanta, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. Legislation to recognize the contributions of a group of World War II spies is hung up in Congress. Some 75 years ago, the OSS carried out missions behind enemy lines in Nazi Germany and the Pacific theatre. Gleason's group was tasked with halting the Japanese advance into China. Gleason and his comrades did this by detonating bridges, railroad tracks and anything else. 'We just blew stuff up left and right,' said Gleason. AP Photo/David Goldman

  • Memorabilia decorates a wall in the home of Frank Gleason, 96, rear, a retired colonel with the Office of Strategic Services, in Atlanta, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. Legislation to recognize the contributions of a group of World War II spies is hung up in Congress. Some 75 years ago, the OSS carried out missions behind enemy lines in Nazi Germany and the Pacific theatre. Gleason's group was tasked with halting the Japanese advance into China. Gleason and his comrades did this by detonating bridges, railroad 
tracks and anything else. 'We just blew stuff up left and right,' said Gleason. AP Photo/David Goldman

    Memorabilia decorates a wall in the home of Frank Gleason, 96, rear, a retired colonel with the Office of Strategic Services, in Atlanta, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. Legislation to recognize the contributions of a group of World War II spies is hung up in Congress. Some 75 years ago, the OSS carried out missions behind enemy lines in Nazi Germany and the Pacific theatre. Gleason's group was tasked with halting the Japanese advance into China. Gleason and his comrades did this by detonating bridges, railroad tracks and anything else. 'We just blew stuff up left and right,' said Gleason. AP Photo/David Goldman

  • Memorabilia decorates a wall in the home of Frank Gleason, 96, a retired colonel with the Office of Strategic Services, in Atlanta, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. Legislation to recognize the contributions of a group of World War II spies is hung up in Congress. Some 75 years ago, the OSS carried out missions behind enemy lines in Nazi Germany and the Pacific theatre. Gleason's group was tasked with halting the Japanese advance into China. Gleason and his comrades did this by detonating bridges, railroad tracks and anything else. 'We just blew stuff up left and right,' said Gleason. AP Photo/David Goldman

    Memorabilia decorates a wall in the home of Frank Gleason, 96, a retired colonel with the Office of Strategic Services, in Atlanta, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. Legislation to recognize the contributions of a group of World War II spies is hung up in Congress. Some 75 years ago, the OSS carried out missions behind enemy lines in Nazi Germany and the Pacific theatre. Gleason's group was tasked with halting the Japanese advance into China. Gleason and his comrades did this by detonating bridges, railroad tracks and anything else. 'We just blew stuff up left and right,' said Gleason. AP Photo/David Goldman

  • Frank Gleason, 96, a retired colonel with the Office of Strategic Services, sits for a portrait at his home in Atlanta, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. Legislation to recognize the contributions of a group of World War II spies is hung up in Congress. Some 75 years ago, the OSS carried out missions behind enemy lines in Nazi Germany and the Pacific theatre. 'I would be extremely proud to get a gold medal for what we did for our country,' said Gleason, one of the few remaining veterans of the OSS, the World War II-era forerunner to the CIA. 'What we did was a little exciting.' AP Photo/David Goldman

    Frank Gleason, 96, a retired colonel with the Office of Strategic Services, sits for a portrait at his home in Atlanta, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. Legislation to recognize the contributions of a group of World War II spies is hung up in Congress. Some 75 years ago, the OSS carried out missions behind enemy lines in Nazi Germany and the Pacific theatre. 'I would be extremely proud to get a gold medal for what we did for our country,' said Gleason, one of the few remaining veterans of the OSS, the World War II-era forerunner to the CIA. 'What we did was a little exciting.' AP Photo/David Goldman

  • Frank Gleason, 96, a retired colonel with the Office of Strategic Services, is photographed at his home in Atlanta, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. Legislation to recognize the contributions of a group of World War II spies is hung up in Congress. Some 75 years ago, the OSS carried out missions behind enemy lines in Nazi Germany and the Pacific theatre. 'I would be extremely proud to get a gold medal for what we did for our country,' said Gleason, one of the few remaining veterans of the OSS, the World War II-era forerunner to the CIA. 'What we did was a little exciting.' AP Photo/David Goldman

    Frank Gleason, 96, a retired colonel with the Office of Strategic Services, is photographed at his home in Atlanta, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. Legislation to recognize the contributions of a group of World War II spies is hung up in Congress. Some 75 years ago, the OSS carried out missions behind enemy lines in Nazi Germany and the Pacific theatre. 'I would be extremely proud to get a gold medal for what we did for our country,' said Gleason, one of the few remaining veterans of the OSS, the World War II-era forerunner to the CIA. 'What we did was a little exciting.' AP Photo/David Goldman

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