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Jakarta Post

Depok council to propose replacement for ‘religious city’ draft bylaw

  • News Desk

    The Jakarta Post

Jakarta   /   Thu, August 1, 2019   /   06:33 pm
Depok council to propose replacement for ‘religious city’ draft bylaw A mural on Jl. Ir. Juanda, in Depok, West Java. (Kompas.com/Nurkhikmah Yuliastuti)

The Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P) faction on Depok city council in West Java will oppose the controversial “religious city” draft bylaw to guarantee the freedom of religion and ensure religious harmony for all the city’s residents.

The “religious city” draft bylaw was proposed by the Depok administration earlier this year in an effort to protect families through the elimination of, among other things, corruption, adultery, substance abuse, gambling, abortion, pornography, riba (usury), heresy, the exploitation of women and children, and disturbing public order.

Council speaker Hendrik Tangke Allo of the PDI-P, however, claimed that its proposed draft bylaw on the freedom of religion and religious harmony would guarantee the freedom of religion and religious harmony for all the communities in Depok.

“What people need is the guarantee of freedom and religious harmony for communities. The city administration is obliged to stipulate things like that and ensure it is implemented well," Hendrik said on Thursday, tempo.co reported.

The religious city draft bylaw currently states that residents have the right to pray according to their own religion, and employers must also provide a space and time for their employees to pray.

According to Article 11(3) of the bylaw, every Muslim must prioritize the sharia economy and avoid riba.

Article 14 (1) states that residents must dress modestly according to their respective religious teachings and within the “polite” norms of the Depok community. The next clause states that residents must respect and appreciate this sartorial etiquette and the boundaries of their respective religions.

Finally, every institution, whether it be part of the regional administration or in the private sector, must regulate a dress code for its employees in accordance with prevailing municipality laws, religious teachings and within the norms of the Depok community. (sau)