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Jakarta Post
The Jakarta Post
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High-rise buildings must provide access for fiber optics

  • News Desk
    News Desk

    The Jakarta Post

Jakarta | Wed, April 25, 2018 | 06:40 pm
High-rise buildings must provide access for fiber optics Cars pass high-rise buildings along the iconic Hotel Indonesia traffic circle in the heart of Jakarta on Feb. 24, 2016. (JP/Wienda Parwitasari)

In a bid to spur digital economic growth in Jakarta, the government and city administration are set to require high-rise buildings to provide access for the installation of fiber optics to internet or phone operators.

Communications and Information Minister Rudiantara said the regulation should be implemented soon, without the city administration having to wait for the completion of the planned project to fix utility ducts in Jakarta.

“The most important thing is that all high-rise buildings in Jakarta have to give access for the installation of fiber optic,” Rudiantara said on Wednesday, according to kompas.com.

Meanwhile, to support the growth of the digital economy, Jakarta Deputy Governor Sandiaga Uno said the city administration would invite private parties to participate in the project to install all cables into ducts through a public-private partnership (PPP) scheme.

“We want to ensure that high-rise buildings will be served by an integrated duct system,” Sandiaga said, adding that the project to fix utility ducts would kick off soon.

The city administration has long planned to build a duct system to house underground utility cables, which often clog waterways and cause flooding.

The messy cables may also harm residents.

In September last year, 49-year-old Suriyah died after she was electrocuted by a power pole on Jl. Percetakan Negara, Central Jakarta, while taking her granddaughter to school. (cal)

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