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Jakarta Post

More journalists assaulted by police during Job Creation Law protests: AJI

  • Dyaning Pangestika and Ruslan Sangadji

    The Jakarta Post

​​​​​​​ Jakarta/Palu, Central Sulawesi   /   Sat, October 10, 2020   /   09:25 am
More journalists assaulted by police during Job Creation Law protests: AJI Family visit: Relatives attempt to meet protesters detained at the Jakarta Police headquarters on Oct. 9. The police arrested about 1,000 individuals, who were accused of being involved in violence during street rallies against the Job Creation Law on Thursday. (JP/Dhoni Setiawan)

Civil groups have reported that more journalists were reportedly assaulted by law enforcement officers while covering protests against the highly controversial Job Creation Law on Thursday.

The Alliance of Independent Journalists (AJI) reported on Friday at least seven journalists were attacked by police officers while covering the protests in Jakarta. The number, however, could increase as the organization has yet to look at every report.

“Although most journalists were wearing attributes to separate themselves from the protesters, they were still targeted by the police,” AJI Jakarta chairman Asnil Bambani said in a statement on Friday.

Among the seven journalists was CNNIndonesia.com’s Tohirin, who said he was hit in the head and beaten by a police officer while reporting on the arrests of several protesters in Harmoni, Central Jakarta.

According to Tohirin, the officer had asked whether he recorded the arrest on his cellphone, to which Tohirin answered he had not. The officer, however, did not believe him and confiscated the cellphone. When they found a picture of another officer putting a protester in a chokehold, the officers smashed the phone on the ground.

“I was interrogated and yelled at. They also hit my head, but luckily, I was wearing a helmet at the time,” Tohirin said, adding that he had shown his press identity card and uniform to the officers.

Read also: One journalist beaten, another missing after covering protests

Peter Rotti of Suara.com was also allegedly beaten by the police after he recorded a video of officers allegedly attacking a protester near a bus stop. Meanwhile, merahputih.com journalist Ponco Sulaksono has reportedly gone missing after covering the demonstration near the National Monument (Monas) late on Thursday evening.

Several student press journalists were also reportedly apprehended by the police and taken to the Jakarta Police headquarters.

AJI Jakarta reported on Friday evening that the police had released all journalists arrested during the protests.

“We urge the National Police to investigate police violence against journalists while covering the protests. Meanwhile, editors-in-chief should also protect their journalists,” said Asnil.

In Palu, Central Sulawesi, three journalists were also reportedly assaulted by the police while covering a protest against the new law on Jl. Sam Ratulangi on Thursday. They were Alsih Marselina and Adhy Rifaldi of sultengnews.com as well as kailipost.com’s Windy.

“We told the police that we were journalists. We even showed our identity cards to them, but they hit us,” said Alsih.

They have reported the incidents to the police’s internal affairs division (Propam).

Read also: Rallies against job creation law turn violent as police clash with protesters

National Police spokesperson Insp. Gen. Argo Yuwono said the violent actions against journalists during the protests had occurred because of the chaotic and unpredictable nature of the situations.

“We know that we’re supposed to protect journalists. However, when the situation turns into chaos, police officers have to protect themselves,” Argo said on Friday, as quoted by kompas.com.

He asserted that the force was committed to investigating the incidents and urged journalists to show their identification and identify themselves to police officers prior covering the protests.