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More than one in four Indonesians experienced suicidal thoughts: Survey

News Desk

The Jakarta Post

Jakarta  /  Sun, June 23, 2019  /  11:07 am
More than one in four Indonesians experienced suicidal thoughts: Survey

According to the study, women are more prone to suicidal thoughts than men across the archipelago. (Shutterstock/-)

The latest study by global public opinion and data company YouGov finds that 27 percent of Indonesians have experienced suicidal thoughts. 

Furthermore, the data from YouGov shows that six of the aforementioned 27 percent Indonesians have frequently experienced such thoughts.

According to the study, women are more prone to suicidal thoughts than men across the archipelago, and Indonesians aged 18 to 24 struggle with suicidal thoughts more often than older people.

The research also reveals that 36 percent of Indonesians have engaged in self-harm. The practice is particularly prevalent among the younger generation, with 45 percent of the country’s youth admitting to having inflicted physical harm on themselves.

Read also: Warning signs of suicide and how you should respond

The research report goes on to show that the most commonly experienced mental health issues are anxiety and depression. However, the data reveal that only 42 percent of those suffering from mental health issues have actively sought professional help. According to the study, men are more likely to seek help than women.

The survey also sheds light on what might be keeping mentally troubled individuals from getting professional help. 

Forty-six percent of the respondents with mental health problems are unsure where to get help, while 45 percent have been concerned about the cost of medical treatment. Other factors include embarrassment or social stigma and concerns about time commitment. 

In its latest report, YouGov also notes that Indonesians have begun to treat mental health seriously. 

Ninety-percent of the respondents believe that mental health should be given as much consideration as physical health. More than 77 percent agree that mental health should be covered by insurance, while 89 percent think employees ought to be entitled to medical leave for mental health issues. (rfa/kes)

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