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Fewer frills & ruffles: JFW expands fashion trends to New Year

Tertiani ZB Simanjuntak

The Jakarta Post

Jakarta  /  Fri, January 8, 2021  /  02:41 pm
Fewer frills & ruffles: JFW expands fashion trends to New Year

Into the future: A model sports a structured face shield made of crinoline and designed by renowned accessories designer Rinaldy A. Yunardi. (Courtesy of JFW 2021/-)

Sixty-something fashion designers and labels have put on display their latest works at Jakarta Fashion Week 2021, sharing some common traits in the looks they offered for the New Year.

There were no breakthrough or definite major trendsetters. Instead, the designers carried over trends from people’s newly adopted lifestyles onto the runway with more options for the fashion-conscious crowd to choose from.

Aired virtually, the 16 runway shows’ underlying message was about moving on from the comfortable house dresses and bike shorts that have brought us joy during the lockdown.

However, loungewear and activewear still dominated the 2021 catalogue, which includes sweats and pants, hoodie shirts and two-piece outfits fit for sleepwear.

Yet there were some looks that could be seen as hints of which future trends are on their way, if not already here to stay.

Into the future: A model sports a structured face shield made of crinoline and designed by renowned accessories designer Rinaldy A. Yunardi. Into the future: A model sports a structured face shield made of crinoline and designed by renowned accessories designer Rinaldy A. Yunardi. (Courtesy of JFW 2021/-)

SIMPLY STYLISH

The most distinctive aspect of the shows was the simplicity of the designs, which offered clean cuts and simple pieces that allowed for creative mixing and matching or layering up with a minimalist style.

This trend goes hand-in-hand with the principles of eco-conscious fashion. Environmentally friendly fabrics and production methods were among the principles the designers and labels incorporated in their collections.

Chitra Subiyakto of Sejauh Mata Memandang utilized the fashion house’s deadstock and worked together with Pable, a company that upcycles textile waste, to present an array of simple pieces such as kebaya tops, bustier camisoles and wrap skirts that, when all combined, complete a traditional kebaya look.

Using other pieces from the collection, the look can be paired with pants or a blazer or shirt dress that can be worn as an outer, allowing for a wide range of looks.

 

LOOSE SILHOUETTES

JFW 2021 showed a lot fewer structured silhouettes or fitted tailored pieces than in years past. More baggy yet geometric looks were on display, bending the gender and body-type rules of fashion – a celebration of the body-positive movement.

The loose silhouettes of designer Lulu Lutfi Labibi’s androgynous “Sandang Hening Cipta dan Puisi” collection were described by him as “simple yet deliberating”. This trend was also seen in “Sand Castle” by Rani Hatta, the latest collection of label Jan Sober, as well as the works of the finalists of the Menswear Fashion Design Competition (LPM Menswear 2020).

Mix and match: Fashion label AMOTSYAMSURIMUDA combines past trends in each look within its Terang (Luminous) collection.Mix and match: Fashion label AMOTSYAMSURIMUDA combines past trends in each look within its Terang (Luminous) collection. (Courtesy of JFW 2021/--)

EASY ON THE EYES

Monochromatic schemes and pastel colors were accentuated with pops of colors here and there throughout the shows, followed by vibrant and bold prints.

Ready-to-wear label Ai Syarif 1965 offered strokes of colorful paints in its summer wear, each look of which was equipped with colorful bucket hats and large eco-bags that came with stuffed toys attached.

Eureka and Calla The Label welcomed the year ahead with flower prints of different tones. The former chose pastel shades for its “Cherish” collection, whose motifs were made with hand-stamped batik, while the Calla collection’s main theme, “Happiness”, saw large flower patterns of strong colors.

 

PRINTS AND PATTERNS

Besides flower prints, checked patterns also made their way in. Jenahara launched “Academia”, which brought the prep look to the next level, while Tities Sapoetra under his TS The Label created a monochromatic labyrinth pattern for “The Dynamic of Urbanity”, a collection inspired from the electronic circuit board and products of an electronic company.

EUREKAEUREKA (Courtesy of JFW 2021/-)

Michelle Tjokrosaputro of bateeq introduced Ambawani – an original motif inspired by batik tambal and combining traditional motifs. In her collection titled “Kasada”, the motifs were arranged in a checkerboard pattern.

Amot Syamsuri Muda used black-on-white drawing art prints for his “Terang” (Luminous) collection under his eponymous label, while COTTONINK in collaboration with visual artist Abenk Alter created eye-catching prints to lift up the mood.

UTILITY FASHION

Pocket detailings were the latest craze of the runways. As people nowadays tend to leave their bags at home, cloth pockets have entered as a brand new category in the fashion industry. 

The placement of pockets on vests, tailored jackets, coats, shirts and cargo pants was the key and the devil lied in the details – front flap, straps, patches, toggles and zipper pockets added to both the aesthetic and practicality of the utility wear on display.

Rani Hatta’s collection “Cocoon”, under her newly launched premium line Hattaco, were inspired by military uniforms, while menswear label Super Sentimental Secret Theory (SSST) brought blue-collar uniforms to the runway.

The latter presented detached pockets, detached pocket bags, belt bags (not to be confused with fanny packs) and even backpacks.

Sejauh Mata Memandang offered a wide sash belt with hidden pockets that can function as a purse when slung around the body or running around the waist, and a shawl when used to cover the neck and shoulders.

 

THROWBACKS

JFW 2021 also incorporated the trends of the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and even the 1920s.

On the runway, models wore choker necklaces with their hair parted down the middle in a nod to the ‘20s style, while the loose silhouettes without a definite waistline were a reminder of how women in that era sported a corset or structured dresses.

The swinging ‘60s and ‘70s could be spotted from the flower prints and flare pants, as well as the exaggerated and feminine collars that could be seen in Wilsen Willim’s “Play” collection and Veronica Natasha Tanwijaya’s “mulier vero”.

Tities Sapoetra’s runway show brought back the ‘90s beaded accessories, as well the bucket hats and cargo pants that first emerged in that era.

Amot’s collection incorporated two or more looks of the past in addition to new trends in each design, such as tailcoat-cut shirts combined with cargo pants, or a cropped jacket with an exaggerated futuristic shoulders look combined with toggle-hem pants.

Healthy vibe: Batik fashion house bateeq created an original motif called Ambawani, which is inspired by a traditional batik patch believed to have a healing property. Healthy vibe: Batik fashion house bateeq created an original motif called Ambawani, which is inspired by a traditional batik patch believed to have a healing property. (Courtesy of JFW 2021/-)

FREEDOM

The versatility of comfort shoes and sneakers was proven on the runway when paired with different kinds of fashion styles as shown by Rinaldy A. Yunardi in his shoe line Refounders and Rowland Asfales’ shoe brand Pijakbumi, which used organic materials.

Another thing worth mentioning from JFW 2021 is the tie detailing. Instead of knotting the ties into a bow, the looks were made into loosely looped ties or left dangling, as if to give the customer the freedom to determine which look they prefer.

This theme “Inspiring Creativism” was originally meant to describe how the designers kept on working despite limited resources and mobility during the pandemic. But it somehow, purposefully or not, succeeded in evoking people to try something new and express themselves through their wardrobes. (ste)

 

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