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Jakarta Post

To fight graft, can we shame the shameless?

  • Ina Parlina and Hans Nicholas Jong

    The Jakarta Post

Jakarta   /   Fri, September 30 2016   /  07:56 am
Public shame or inhumane punishment?: Two men wearing placards that read “I am a pickpocket” stand at Manggarai Train Station in Jakarta on Aug. 8 after being caught by the police. The government is planning to widen the use of public shaming as a punishment and begin releasing the photos of corrupt officials.(Courtesy of kompas.com/Nibras Nada Nailufar)(Courtesy of kompas.com/Nibras Nada Nailufar)

Public shame or inhumane punishment?: Two men wearing placards that read “I am a pickpocket” stand at Manggarai Train Station in Jakarta on Aug. 8 after being caught by the police. The government is planning to widen the use of public shaming as a punishment and begin releasing the photos of corrupt officials.(Courtesy of kompas.com/Nibras Nada Nailufar)As prison sentences and hefty fines have failed to deter people from corruption in the country, legal experts have mulled on introducing social sanctions for graft convicts.

But can Indonesians really be shamed?

Erika Widyaningsih, a netizen who was involved in #SaveKPK, a campaign supporting the national antigraft body during a standoff with the police in early 2015, says shaming convicts could work since the shame of receiving social punishment publicly might discourage them from repeating the crime.

“For ins...