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This is why you pee more when it's cold

News Desk

The Jakarta Post

Jakarta  /  Wed, January 2, 2019  /  01:00 am
This is why you pee more when it's cold

Diuresis is caused by your body sensing the threat of hypothermia, so it is important to be mindful of how cold you are getting, and whether or not it might be safer to try to get somewhere warm. (Shutterstock/File)

One of the most common phenomena that is rarely talked about is the increased need to pee when you are feeling cold, also known as cold-induced diuresis, or simply cold diuresis.

The term diuresis refers to a condition where the kidneys filter more than usual bodily fluid, according to Healthline.

The average rate of urination for adults is between four to six times a day, however people, with diuresis will urinate more often than that; without a change in fluid or salt intake. 

Read also: Too much salt in diet could lead to nighttime urination: Study

While diuresis refers to a condition possibly caused by medical conditions, cold-induced diuresis refers to the body’s reaction when it senses the possible danger of hypothermia. The body constricts blood vessels to reduce blood flow to the skin and keeps the core body temperature around the internal organs constant, according to an article published by Arkansas Urology.

The constricting blood vessels cause your blood pressure to rise as there is the same amount of blood being pumped through smaller blood vessels and arteries. Due to the increased blood pressure, the kidneys end up filtering blood at a faster rate than usual to reduce the blood’s volume, in an effort to decrease blood pressure. The excess fluid then becomes urine and this causes you need to pee more often when you are feeling cold.

Diuresis is caused by your body sensing the threat of hypothermia, so it is important to be mindful of how cold you are getting, and whether or not it might be safer to try to get somewhere warm. (acr/kes)