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Jakarta Post

Ride-hailing companies drop ball in customer safety, YLKI says

  • Winda A. Charmila

    The Jakarta Post

Jakarta   /   Fri, March 23, 2018   /   06:49 pm
Ride-hailing companies drop ball in customer safety, YLKI says Yun Siska Rohani, 29, was found dead on Sunday after she was allegedly murdered by Fadli Nizar Himba, a 28-year-old driver of a ride-hailing vehicle. (Shutterstock/-)

Despite their popularity and contribution to the country’s economy, ride-hailing companies are struggling to ensure customer safety, with crimes involving drivers of ride-hailing apps still rampant.

Yun Siska Rohani, 29, was found dead on Sunday after she was allegedly murdered by Fadli Nizar Himba, a 28-year-old driver of a ride-hailing vehicle. He was allegedly assisted by his twin brother Fahmi Idris Himba, 28.

Siska, who worked as a wedding organizer, ordered the vehicle at midnight from Kosenda Hotel in Kebon Kacang, Central Jakarta, with Harris Hotel in Tebet, South Jakarta, marked as the destination. Instead of transporting her there, Fadli, who was accompanied by his brother, allegedly drove his car to the Jagorawi toll road and robbed her, asking for Rp 20 million (US$1,400).

However, after finding that Siska did not have much money in her bank account, Fadli allegedly killed her out of anger and disposed of her body in Cibinong, Bogor, West Java. The suspects were arrested on Monday.

Indonesian Consumers Foundation (YLKI) chairman Tulus Abadi said that under the current system, if a driver of a ride-hailing vehicle committed a crime, the operator could not be held responsible.

“Even if the victim sues them, it will be useless because the operators can say they only created the system, while the responsibility for whatever occurs in the field rests on the drivers,” Tulus said Thursday.

“It is very clear that in Siska’s case, there is no such thing as customer protection. Surely, criminal acts also happen with conventional taxis. However, they at least have call centers for customers who need an immediate response."

It also proved that the operators of the applications did not have clear standards when recruiting drivers, he added.