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Experts believe wall structure in Mojokerto to be burial site of Ken Arok's descendant

Asip Hasani

The Jakarta Post

Mojokerto, East Java  /  Sun, November 17, 2019  /  01:02 pm
  • An ancient wall in Kumitir village, Mojokerto, East Java, is believed to be part of a burial ground of Narasinghamurti, descendant of Ken Arok, a historical figure in East Java.

    An ancient wall in Kumitir village, Mojokerto, East Java, is believed to be part of a burial ground of Narasinghamurti, descendant of Ken Arok, a historical figure in East Java. OF JP/Asip Hasani

    An ancient wall in Kumitir village, Mojokerto, East Java, is believed to be part of a burial ground of Narasinghamurti, descendant of Ken Arok, a historical figure in East Java.

  • The inside part of the wall.

    The inside part of the wall. OF JP/Asip Hasani

    The inside part of the wall.

  • A team from the Trowulan Heritage Conservation Agency (BPCB) at Kumitir village, Mojokerto, East Java, on Nov. 2.

    A team from the Trowulan Heritage Conservation Agency (BPCB) at Kumitir village, Mojokerto, East Java, on Nov. 2. OF JP/Asip Hasani

    A team from the Trowulan Heritage Conservation Agency (BPCB) at Kumitir village, Mojokerto, East Java, on Nov. 2.

  • The wall is located among the digging field of brick makers in the area.

    The wall is located among the digging field of brick makers in the area. OF JP/Asip Hasani

    The wall is located among the digging field of brick makers in the area.

  • The excavation team of Trowulan Heritage Conservation Agency (BPCB) at work.

    The excavation team of Trowulan Heritage Conservation Agency (BPCB) at work. OF JP/Asip Hasani

    The excavation team of Trowulan Heritage Conservation Agency (BPCB) at work.

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Experts from the Trowulan Heritage Conservation Agency (BPCB) believe that a thick wall structure found in Kumitir village, Mojokerto, East Java, is part of the burial ground of Narasinghamurti. The grandson of Ken Arok, founder of the Singasari kingdom that ruled East Java in the 13th century, Narasinghamurti’s grandson Raden Wijaya went on to found the influential Majapahit kingdom. Around 200 meters of the wall have been fully uncovered after the archaeology team dug for 10 days in late October. It is 1.4 m in height and is built from bricks believed to be typical of those used in the Majapahit era.   “Around 250 m from our last spot, we found a similar wall structure. This means that the wall stretches for more than 450 m,” archaeologist Wicaksono Dwi Nugroho told The Jakarta Post in early November. According to the team, the wall faces east and str...